Cardiac Electrophysiology-4 Important Step

Cardiac Electrophysiology (EP) research evaluates the electrical system or activity of your heart and is used to determine irregular heartbeats or arrhythmia. Catheters and wire electrodes that measure electrical activity are inserted into blood arteries that enter the heart during the test.

It’s critical to comprehend the electrical circuitry of the heart. Specialized cells in the heart muscle can generate electrical impulses. These impulses spread in a predictable sequence in healthy hearts, causing the heart muscle to contract and pump blood. Electrical signals do not travel evenly throughout the heart muscle if you have a cardiac rhythm issue or arrhythmia.

Cardiac Electrophysiology studies (EPS) are used to assess your heart’s electrical activity. Doctors can examine where the electrical signals in your heart begin and travel using specialized catheter tubes that can transmit electrical impulses. This can help them pinpoint the specific location of the problem in your heart.

Cardiac Electrophysiology
Fig 1: Heart

Cardiac Telemetry & 6 Critical Indications

What does Cardiac Electrophysiology Detect?

Cardiac Electrophysiology check for aberrant cardiac rhythms, identify them and treat them. Arrhythmias are irregular heart rhythms. EPs must understand how the heart operates, what types of arrhythmias exist, and what causes them.

Among the diseases that cardiac electrophysiology can diagnose and treat are:

  • Atrial fibrillation.
  • Bradycardia.
  • Tachycardia.
  • Ventricular tachycardia.
  • Supraventricular tachycardia.
  • Ventricular fibrillation.
  • Sudden cardiac arrest.
  • Long QT syndrome.
  • Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome.
  • Other arrhythmias(caused by pregnancy, medicines, or metabolic problems.)
Cardiac Electrophysiology
Fig 2: Symptoms of Atrial fibrillation

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Preparing for Cardiac Electrophysiology

It is important to complete the following steps before your Cardiac Electrophysiology (EP) research or catheter ablation procedure:

  • Find out what foods you’re allowed to eat. To avoid nausea, you will be urged to fast for six to eight hours before the surgery.
  • Make arrangements to be driven to and from the hospital by a friend or family member.
  • Make a list of your current drugs and their dosages with you.
  • To achieve reliable results, you may be requested to cease using certain medications several days before the research. Coumadin and other blood thinners are routinely stopped four days before the surgery. Please inform your doctor if you are taking a blood thinner.
  • Any allergic reactions to drugs should be reported to your doctor or nurse.

The following are the final measures to prepare for the cardiac electrophysiology study once you arrive at the hospital:

  • Empty your bladder as completely as possible for comfort. During the procedure, a bedpan or urinal will be offered. A catheter may be put in to drain your bladder of urine during the surgery, depending on the length of your previous procedure.
  • If medications are needed, a tiny intravenous (IV) needle will be put into a vein in your arm.
Cardiac Electrophysiology
Fig 3: Procedure of cardiac electrophysiology

Procedure of Cardiac Electrophysiology

  • The cardiac electrophysiology study will take place in the hospital’s electrophysiology laboratory, where you will be placed on an X-ray table. There will be a camera and television displays nearby, as well as heart monitors and other gadgets. To link you to monitoring equipment, electrodes will be implanted on your chest and back. A blood pressure cuff will be fitted to your upper arm to monitor your blood pressure.
  • To prevent infection, a nurse will shave and clean the region around the groin and maybe the neck where the catheters will be placed. An antiseptic will be used to clean the region. In sterilized blankets, your body will be draped.
  • Depending on the study, you may be given drugs intravenously (in your arm) to sedate you or make you feel sleepy.
  • These drugs can help you feel less anxious and relieve pain. Your doctor will let you know if sedative drugs are required.

Cardiac electrophysiology research is divided into two parts:

  • Recording electrical impulses to assess the electrical function of the heart.
  • Pacing the heart to induce particular aberrant rhythms to observe them under controlled circumstances

To activate your arrhythmia, medications are occasionally employed. Your heart may be racing or thumping. This may make you nervous, but don’t be concerned. The doctors seek to generate the irregular rhythm that is causing your condition so that the arrhythmia can be treated. Tell your nurse or doctor if you have any unpleasant symptoms, such as chest pain, dizziness, shortness of breath, nausea, or pain.

Cardiac Electrophysiology
Fig 4: Heart Rhythm

After the Cardiac Electrophysiology Study Follow the Procedure

  • After the Cardiac Electrophysiology study is completed :-
  • To avoid bleeding, the catheters are removed and pressure is administered to the groin and neck areas.
  • To allow the catheter sites to seal, you’ll need to be in bed for four to six hours. Make no movement or bending of your leg.
  • You will be checked regularly. Call the nurse right away if you experience any sudden discomfort or detect any bleeding at the site.
  • Following the test, your doctor may discuss some of the preliminary findings with you.
  • You may be able to eat and drink if you feel well enough.

Returning to Your Home

Please follow these instructions once you’ve been discharged from the hospital and returned home:

For the first 24 hours, keep your activity to a minimum. For the first week, avoid straining or lifting heavy objects weighing more than 10 pounds.

If you’re driving home for several hours, take a break every hour to stretch your legs and walk for a few minutes to avoid blood clots in your legs.

If new blood appears on the dressing, apply hard pressure to the incision site for about 20 minutes. If bleeding persists, contact your doctor or go to an emergency hospital while continuing to apply pressure. Keep the dressing on till the next day

What does a cardiac electrophysiology procedure entail?

Electrophysiology (EP) research evaluates the electrical system or activity of your heart and is used to determine irregular heartbeats or arrhythmia. Catheters and wire electrodes that measure electrical activity are inserted into blood arteries that enter the heart during the test.

Is there a limit to how many times you can get an ablation?

It is very appropriate to do two ablations; half of the population will do so. A third ablation is not unrealistic in the perfect candidate, a younger individual who is severely symptomatic and motivated. You should only proceed beyond three ablations on an infinitesimal number of people.

Is there a limit to how many times you can get an ablation?

It is very appropriate to do two ablations; half of the population will do so. A third ablation is not unrealistic in the perfect candidate, a younger individual who is severely symptomatic and motivated. You should only proceed beyond three ablations on an infinitesimal number of people.

What are the limitations following cardiac ablation?

To reduce the danger of bleeding after the catheter ablation, you will most likely need to lie still for two to six hours. Members of the medical team may apply pressure to the catheter insertion site. As you heal, your heart will be monitored by special devices.

How can you tell if an ablation procedure is successful?

An ECG (electrocardiogram), which records the heart’s rhythm, is required to evaluate whether ablation was successful because people may still experience episodes after the blanking phase but not feel them.

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